Friday, 30 August 2019

Review of "Angel" by Susan Kinsey - mommy joins the mob

A recently divorce mother of end thirties saves a small girl from drowning. Her father turns out to "be connected". He tells her he will always help her because of that. She ends up working for him.

The story is like a series about the world of criminals although the criminal activities are vague sometimes.
You are never told what is really going on in their heads.

I had expected more of a romance novel.
Reviewed for Netgalley: 3 stars out of 5








Monday, 19 August 2019

Review of "In darkest days may blossom" by Leila Snow - injustice for the poor in 18th century London

In late 18th century England there was not much justice when you were a poor woman and that brings the author to light very well. It is a sad situation. She also shows the class differences and the struggle people have to live through. Being a Scotsman makes you frowned upon, being rich but heaven forbids had merchant parents keeps you out of the top circles, being poor have you committed to a workhouse and when employers are cruel there is no one to turn to.

The knight in shining armour is a the son of the magistrate who sees his father's constables about to beat a girl to death and steps in to save her.

There was two things I had doubts over: in those days and age you would not contemplate marrying someone so far below your social station. Maybe the idea that he really loved her and she him and the possibility to marry could have come up at the end.

The other thing is that I had the feeling the book ended a bit too soon. I think the writer wants to continue from the viewpoint of the other protagonists but I always think it is better to write a tome including the whole story. Hence the 1 star deduction.

Do not think you buy a sweet romance book this is more Dickens doom and gloom. But it had me spellbound (lawyer so I was interested in the whole misconduct of justice).


PS the vows are silly! No one would mention orgasms in that day and ages let alone in church!!!!

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Saturday, 17 August 2019

Review of "In the Far Pashmina Mountains" - Raj India and the British Afghan war set in a historical novel

A highborn lady who is on the run to meet her lover leaves her baby behind. The child is raised by the poor family of the lighthousekeeper. She saves people when their ship has hit a nearby rock and one of the survivors will play an important part in her life. When she is a grown woman she joins her husband in India and ends up in the middle of the First Anglo-Afghan war. It was the first time in history the British conquered Kabul but it ended in a total disaster,

The lighthousekeeper's daughter part I did recognise as the real life story it was indeed inspired by but the Afghan disaster was new to me. It just made me realise that in our lifetime we made the same mistakes there.

I read that the author has been to India herself and that her ancestors were posted there. It is clear she did a lot of research in the subject. 

The book makes a very interesting read because although it is a historical novel it still keeps pretty close to the historical facts and you really hope the best for the heroine.

This was the real lighthousekeeper's daughter who saved the people who were shipwrecked: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Darling


















More about the Anglo Afghan war here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Anglo-Afghan_War















William Brydon CB (10 October 1811 – 20 March 1873) was an assistant surgeon in the British East India Company Army during the First Anglo-Afghan War, famous for reportedly being the only member of an army of 4,500 men, plus 12,000 accompanying civilians, to reach safety in Jalalabad at the end of the long retreat from Kabul.








Review of "Tears of the Dragon" by Jean Moran - Hongkong WW2 - Japanese internment

Hongkong WWII: A female young doctor works at the army hospital in Hong Kong. The war makes travel oversees dangerous and in the Chinese hinterland the Japs are fighting the Chinese but so far Hongkong is a peaceful place.

One evening Rowena and nurse Alice take the ferry to Chinese Kowloon to have a drink at a bar they heard rumours of. In the bar they meet the owner, an Irishman who is stationed as a sergeant major in Hongkong and owns the bar together with his best friend and commanding officer major Harry. Connor is a gregarious man who plays the fiddle and sings but refuses to serve drinks to unaccompanied women.

A guest invites them to share a drink with him. He is Kim Pheloung, a rich businessman with Chinese and maybe other genes. Rowena thinks he is the most beautiful man she had ever seen.

In the days that follow she goes out with both of the men. Connor she likes a lot but Kim she is very attracted to.

Then disaster strikes and the Japanese attack Hong Kong and the world changes in a hell full of horror.

I really liked the novel. It can be very bloody and cruel without going into extreme detail. We witness the horrors of war and internment by the Japanese and also the time shortly after the war when victims try to pick up their lives again.

Although not "romantic" I did admire the way the writer dealt with a "fiftyshadesofgrey"-element. Because in real life most people will hate to be forced unlike all those romance novel girls. Because in books that is never depicted so grimly I think it added to the value of the story even if you keep hoping someone is the romantic hero.

What I think is a glitch is the attitude of her brother towards people of mix race because his own grandmother was Indian.

I would advice the publishers to change their blurb on Amazon as it is full of spoilers! I had not read that and that makes the shock factor of the story more intense.

Friday, 16 August 2019

Review of " The Kazak Contract by PAUL PURNELL " - fast action packed story in an exotic location

James Ballantyne, former army officer and now a diplomat and a covert spy, travels to Kazakhstan on a diplomatic assignment. He tells his local aide Ocksana Petrova that the new part of the capital feels like Brasilia the designer capital of Brazil. However officials wanting a bribe is still as old as time. His work almost finished he has a chat with an American in his hotel . This however changes things and James has to flee  the country.

The novel reads like watching a good action movie. The exotic setting of Kazakhstan and neighbouring countries is interesting.I really liked reading it

 It is not a very long novel. And that brings me to the only negative remark: the story ends abruptly and will continue in another novel. I definitely do not like cliffhangers and would recommend to combine those books into one John le Carre tome size one.


Monday, 12 August 2019

Free book: set in Amsterdam

Rituals of the DeadBy Jennifer S. Alderson

 
In Amsterdam, a 60-year-old mystery is revived when museum researcher Zelda uncovers the story of an anthropologist who vanished in New Guinea. And a mysterious killer will stop at nothing to keep her from the truth…    A museum researcher must solve a decades-old murder before she becomes the killer’s next victim in this riveting dual timeline thriller set in Papua and the Netherlands.

Agats, Dutch New Guinea (Papua), 1961: While collecting Asmat artifacts for a New York museum, American anthropologist Nick Mayfield stumbles upon a smuggling ring organized by high-ranking members of the Dutch colonial government and the Catholic Church. Before he can alert the authorities, he vanishes in a mangrove swamp, never to be seen again.

Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 2018: While preparing for an exhibition of Asmat artifacts in a Dutch ethnographic museum, researcher Zelda Richardson finds Nick Mayfield’s journal in a long-forgotten crate. Before Zelda can finish reading the journal, her housemate is brutally murdered and ‘Give back what is not yours’ is scrawled on their living room wall.

Someone wants ancient history to stay that way—and believes murder is the surest way to keep the past buried.

Can she solve a sixty-year-old mystery before decades of deceit, greed, and retribution cost Zelda her life?
  

Saturday, 10 August 2019

Indian Raj : Review of Beneath an Indian Sky: A heartbreaking historical novel of family secrets, betrayal and love by Renita D'Silva

Three young children are friends in 1930ties India: a poor Muslim boy, a rich Hindu girl and an English one. The Indian girl yearns for knowledge and freedom and the English one is given that but too shy to grasp it.

When they grow up one of them will get a great opportunity and grasps it while the other does a leap of faith and looses all. 

While one is clinging to all she has and lives in fear, the other mourns but uses her life as a testament  of love.

We follow both women's life story. A story that is very emotional and sad oozes a great loss. I was in tears.






Friday, 2 August 2019

Review of "Paramedic to the Prince: An American Paramedic's Account of Life Inside the Mysterious World of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia"

The American EMS who worked in Saudi for about 10 years tells his memoirs. The story might jump from one thing to the other but it gives us a glimpse of that hidden world.

Not the best writing style but an interesting subject. And it makes the culture class evident. How he and his friends would dive in a wetsuit not caring how that looked and on the other hand men then masturbating. How the prince - later king - he works for is nice to his employees and how other people just crap in an operating room expecting others to clean it. Bear in mind it describes the situation of 15 years ago and the aftershocks of 9/11.








 

Indian Raj Romance novels: Review of "A Jasmin Wife" by Jane Coverdale

A Jasmine Wife was the name for a British young woman in her full bloom who would follow her husband to India and then in a short time whiter away.

But Sara Archer is not new to India when she comes to join her husband there at the beginning of the 20th century. She was born in India but lost at a young age both parents and was raised in a rather loveless household of a paternal aunt and uncle. When a bachelor seems to be interested in her and who moreover is stationed in India she falls head of heels for him. But is it him or India she is in love with? In his case it seems he sees marriage more as advantages to his career.

Upon arrival in India she barges into half French - half Indian Ravi Sabran who keeps shocking the circles of polite British society in Madras by living in sin with the wife of an Indian Maharaja who ran from her husband and being filthy rich and a bit of a bandit and who keeps ignoring the fact that the British matrons cannot overlook his Indian ancestry.

The British in Madras are more old fashioned and stuck in the Victorian times as what she experienced in England and are showing not the best characters. For instance when the local Maharadja visits they all try to get jewels off him by praising them.

In India Sara starts looking for her own past and information about her own parents and by doing this meets Ravi again.

We see a ugly naive countrygirl slowly develop in a  in dependant beautiful woman.

The novel digs into the prejudice of those days. It has also a hint of mr Collins and Lady Catherine de Bourgh from "Pride and Prejudice" due to the fact that Charles cannot stop praising the local leading lady in the British circle. That element is often very funny.

It is a light romance novel that guarantees a day of pleasant reading. And right from the start you expect who will end up with whom but that is always the case with this kind of novels.