Monday, 10 June 2019

Review of "Six Women" by Victoria Cross

This is a book written in 1906 but the language is still very modern. However one can see how much is changed in a century by how women are regarded and treated. In the days the novel was published the content would have been regarded as highly scandalous. Not because of erotic behaviour described - it is not -  but it is hinted at and in those days your knickers were your "unmentionables" to paint a picture . But mostly because all six women are in a love affair with a man of a different race or religion.

Annie Sophie Cory (1 October 1868 – 2 August 1952) was a British author of popular, racy, exotic New Woman novels under the pseudonyms Victoria Cross(e), Vivian Cory and V.C. Griffin.
Cory's stories often detail behaviours and desires unusual in the Victorian period such as female cross-dressing, unbridled and unashamed sexual desire, longing for and fear of interracial sexual relationships, and questioning of traditional heterosexual gender roles for men and women. (Source Wikipedia)

When you read this article  https://victorianfictionresearchguides.org/victoria-cross/ she seemed to have been a weird person especially for those days and age. 

This book is a collection of short stories. Some are quite good - the first and the last - the rest is in my opinion a lot less. As the book is free you might just want to try it out of curiosity and because the first story is interesting. In that story an Englishman is told during his wedding night by his new wife that she wedded him for the position and that she does not want any sexual relationship. He accepts a job in India and they do not see each other in the next 20 years. But when he falls in love with an Indian dancing girl his wife goes on the warpath.


Preview of "Three remain" by R.A. Andrade

This science fiction novel had me on the tip of my toes or maybe rather on the edge of my seat and had me going to bed too late. It is a very entertaining read and suspense keeps very high throughout the whole story.

One morning when a lawyer goes to work he finds a woman who was in a carcrash. When they go into town they notice that there is no one around and phones, internet and electricity are not working. The only person they meet is a young girl and there is a huge fog bank blocking the road. Then things get dangerous.

To tell more would spoil your fun but if you like Steven King's novels this is one for you.

An additional plus of this story is that there is a lot of good humour in it although there were situations the teenager grated on my nerves.

This was a preview ARC from Netgalley. The novel will be published 23rd of September 2019.

Comparing two sheikh romances: the friendship turns into love-type and the hanky panky-type

With hotty Sheikh Hamdan from Dubai now married his millions of female instagram followers have to look elsewhere to dream.











And that can be done with the new book by Leslie North that I was asked to review for Netgalley.

The Sheikh's Surprise Heir


I have seen other planecrashes with sheikhs on Amazon but this kind of novellas guarantee a relaxed read on an afternoon waiting for a plane, on the beach or with a cold in bed.

In this story the female heroine is working as a stewardess with a private plane company. One day the client is a Middle Eastern prince who definitely was born with too many silver spoons in his mouth. The guy is annoying in extremis. but is also the only one aboard who bothers saving her after the plane has crash landed. While waiting for his bodyguards to return with help - why do you need them when you can send them all away while you wait with a wounded woman? - she is not that hurt that they cannot play a game of "can we connect on a non-spiritual  level by inserting this part of mine into yours?" Their meeting ends very fruitful with a lot of money and a surprise a bit further on the road as hey why would you use a condom as there is no HIV is there in fairyland. Years later he is the king and they meet again.

A well written easy romance story that has no pitfalls.You do have to like the concept of bed before love though.

A 3 stars out of 5

For sale her on Amazon https://amzn.to/2KDEYGs



To do some comparing I borrowed the one below with my Kindle Unlimited

The Sheikh's Tempted Protectress by Holly Rayner

The Amazon blurb states: "Beth Coolidge has a new assignment: as personal bodyguard to the notoriously hedonistic playboy Sheikh Osman Al-Haddeni, the ex-navy veteran knows she has her work cut out, but she never thought it’d be this tough. The party-loving Sheikh seems to want to regard her more as a pretty-faced status symbol, than a legitimate protector of his life."

Beth recently left the navy and still unemployed when a former boyfriend suggests a stint as the bodygueard of a sheikh. At first she is appalled by the world of glitter but when she gets to know her boss under all the trappings he is a real nice guy who spends days with her in hiding playing boardgames and cooking. It seems a lot more natural that these people fall in love and the novel is not about sex at all. There is also an amount of thriller/suspense in the story as somehow people want him dead.

In this range of novellas a 4 star out of 5.


For sale on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2WQUKEz





Sunday, 9 June 2019

Sunday's free books: A mystery by Edie Claire "Never buried"

First in the USA-Today and Kindle Top Ten bestselling Leigh Koslow Mystery Series! Advertising copywriter Leigh Koslow doesn't pack heat--just a few extra pounds. And she doesn't go looking for trouble. When she moved into her cousin Cara's refurbished Victorian house, she wasn't planning on discovering a corpse--certainly not one that had been embalmed ten years before.

 But as anyone in the small Pittsburgh borough of Avalon could tell her, her cousin's house has a history attached. A history dating back to two mysterious deaths in the summer of 1949.
Someone wants Leigh and Cara out of the house--someone who has something to hide. But that someone doesn't know Leigh's impetuous cousin, and when Cara digs her heels in, Leigh looks to her old college chum, local policewoman Maura Polanski, for help. But the answers the trio find only point to more questions. Were the scandalous deaths of fifty years ago really an accident and a suicide? Or were they murder?
The nearer the women get to the truth, the more desperate someone becomes. Because some secrets are better off kept. Especially when they hit close to home!
"A thoroughly delightful debut. Bright, breezy, and witty. I couldn't put it down."--Tamar Myers
Originally published in mass market paperback by NAL/Penguin, Putnam, Inc. in 1999. Large-Print Edition published by Thorndike, 2002.


For Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004GKNLMY?tag=fbsyemailwwm-20


For KOBO: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/never-buried


Saturday, 8 June 2019

Review of "Occupation secret" by Mario Reading - an SS officer and a French farmgirl bond over music

After having survived the horror of the Eastern Front German SS commander Count Maximilian von Aschau is transferred to rural France where he and his men have to occupy a village and be ready to repel an invasion when it will come. En route to the small town battle hardened but still a devout catholic 28-old Max sees a young woman shelter from the rain in a small roadside chapel. He offers her a lift but the soaked girl refuses.

Lucie Léré.is a poor farmgirl with no education who never has been far away from home and is courted by a neighbour boy who was disfigured during the fighting when Germany invaded France. Her mother is supposed to send lunch to the German SS commander and sees an opportunity to earn an extra franc by pushing her daughter towards the lonely officer.

The two enemies who are worlds apart however bond over their mutual love for music. Danger however lurks around the corner.

This could be the script for a soppy romance story but it is written by a man and a bestselling author and although it is about the love affair between the two enemies it only occasionally mentions sex and deals with a lot more than just them. We also witness one of the biggest SS warcrimes and the violent ways of the Maquis and of civilians who have an account to settle.

There was one thing lacking in my opinion. The part of the Eastern Front depicts the Soviets as cruel adversaries - and they were - but the SS were no choirboys either and that is not that much mentioned. It is reasoned that Max had to join the SS to keep the Nazies away from their country estate as their neighbour was forced out of his due to his lack of support of the regime (I know a real case where they planned a motorway around a castle as a way of revenge) but I wonder if nobility would not have opted for a more traditional role in the Wehrmacht.

The story is a very good story. Although towards the end it feels a bit rushed (like the massacre at
the ruins of Oradour sur Glane

This was the real commander in that area
Oradour sur Glane  but maybe that feels like that to me as I have visited the site) and I would have liked the ending to have happened a bit later. A good epilogue would have been interesting. I wondered if that was due to the fact that this was a posthumous novel.

The cover however feels wrong. Max is described as a tall and thin guy with light blonde hair. The man on the cover is none of that. He also seems to wear the surcoat of the Wehrmacht. Was the SS uniform not black? And the woman on the cover looks like a lady while in the story Lucie is very young, very short and wearing poor cloths. What is worse is that it looks like the cover of another book with the same kind of plot but the more soppy variety and  at first I thought that book had been republished. So I would advice to change it so their age difference will be more clear and he will look more "scary" because that is what he is to the people who do not know him well.


Review: "The count of Monte Christo" as a manga

I remember reading the story as a child in the comic book Donald Duck but not as a comic but as a adaptation summarizing it by three pages each week. I was wondering if I had read the original novel as well. Probably. I do remember seeing a movie. So I knew the story.

The fun for me in reading this adaptation was that it was the first manga I ever read and very much liked the way the creative team explained how to read a mango but even better told about their decisions in adapting a classic novel to a Japanese style of comic book. How she scanned society pages looking for a man who could be the inspiration to the count and such.

Manga is not my favourite style of comic book though. The way people are pictured is too childish for my taste. But for an experiment I really liked this well researched and imagined version of the classical tale. It is also a great way of introducing literature to people who will not be enthusiastic about the more old fashioned, many pages original. And remember I was introduced to this great story by a comic book too.

A four stars out of 5

This book is published the 6th of June 2019