Wednesday, 11 July 2018

Preview of "In the Galway Silence" - An Irish detective noir



In this dark novel Jack Taylor an Irish former policeman has turned alcoholic and private investigator. He is hired to look into the death of heinous twins and finds out they are killed by a vigilante group lead by The Silence.

It is a short, very fast paced novel. I liked that it is written as if we are reading the thoughts of Jack (mostly). What reminded me of the old American detective novels. He interspaced his adventures with the daily news. This makes the novel feel very 2017. Some of the scenes made a lasting impression like the afternoon he spends with his daughter.

If you like thrillers and you are interested in Irish colour locale (you might need to google hurling or the whiskey brands) this is a book I can certainly recommend.


 

Description on AMAZON:

Ken Bruen has been called “hard to resist, with his aching Irish heart, silvery tongue, and bleak noir sensibility” (New York Times Book Review). His prose is as characteristically sharp as his outlook in the latest Jack Taylor novel, In the Galway Silence.


After much tragedy and violence, Jack Taylor has at long last landed at contentment. Of course, he still knocks back too much Jameson and dabbles in uppers, but he has a new woman in his life, a freshly bought apartment, and little sign of trouble on the horizon. Once again, trouble comes to him, this time in the form of a wealthy Frenchman who wants Jack to investigate the double-murder of his twin sons. Jack is meanwhile roped into looking after his girlfriend’s nine-year-old son, and is in for a shock with the appearance of a character out of his past. The plot is one big chess game and all of the pieces seem to be moving at the behest of one dangerously mysterious player: a vigilante called “Silence,” because he’s the last thing his victims will ever hear.


This is Ken Bruen at his most darkly humorous, his most lovably bleak, as he shows us the meaning behind a proverb of his own design―“the Irish can abide almost anything save silence.”

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